How to Live a More Fulfilling Life

How to Live a More Fulfilling Life

Life isn’t exactly easy. There are bills to pay, mortgages and rent, food, fuel and other things which are pretty much essential to living. These same things become more expensive every day thanks to inflation, a dwindling supply and an ever-increasing population.

I’ve found that there are many ways to make the life I’m living more fulfilling, without adding a lot of extra costs to my daily operations. Changes, both small and large, can really make a difference in one’s quality of life. So, here’s a little list of things I think might make everyone a little bit more happier:

Continue reading

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Travel Tips to France

Travel Tips to France

Recently, I made a trip to France to find great photo opportunities and take lots of great pictures. I do that sometimes; just getting up and going somewhere to photograph what I see. While I was there, I did indeed get a handful of quality shots, so I figured I would share the sites I saw and give other photographers a few ideas on what they might photograph if they happen to be in the area too.

Just about everyone knows about the Eiffel Tower, but how many people have taken good pictures of the popular French monument? The angle of a shot is one of the most important factors when taking pictures, but you can’t underestimate the effects of lighting on a finished image.

Continue reading

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Introduction to Photography

Introduction to Photography

While many people would agree that photography is a form of art (good photography, anyhow), I want to take some time today to tell you that there’s plenty of science behind the art. There are several terms every budding photographer should become familiar with before they go out and spend tons of money on a camera which may not fulfill their specific needs. Like everything else, more expensive doesn’t necessarily mean much better. If you’re travelling around the market for a camera, then you should be looking at the following information, not the price tag, and basing your purchasing decision on these several points.

Controlling Exposure Quality

Most cameras have timers built right into them which control how long film is exposed, usually producing quality negatives which yield legible pictures. However, to really be a great photographer, I think it’s important to get more control over the picture-taking process, from beginning to end. Too much light will ruin an image by destroying whatever you’re looking at and giving back a bright, blank image. Too little light will make everything dark, sometimes too dark to see anything at all. This is why understanding the three underlying factors which control exposure quality can be of much help to a photographer. Knowing how to control the ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed will improve your images.

ISO

Essentially, ISO is a number on a scale which represents the sensitivity of a particular camera to lighting conditions. Upgrades in technology have made it so you’re not stuck taking a whole film roll of images in whatever lighting you’re working under – many digital camera come with ISOs which can be adjusted on the fly. While a camera’s native ISO rating can vary widely (from as little as 100 to as high as 1,500+), there’s really only one thing to take away from this: A higher ISO rating provides better images in darker environments, but also increases the amount of grain and other artifacts which appear on the film. Low ISO ratings won’t give any images at all in low light or darkness, but will provide the highest quality images overall when the pictures are taken with enough lighting. This is because your camera has a harder time distinguishing between light and heat as the ISO rises; very technical stuff and certainly worth reading more about, but I think we should proceed.

Continue reading

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Indoor Garden Photography: Dealing With Lighting

Indoor Garden Photography: Dealing With Lighting

 

Landscape and nature photography is my first love. Greeneries are a challenging subject. But the most interesting part is the chance to get out and commune with nature as you capture a glimpse of its amazing beauty. I guess, it’s got to do with personality and tastes. I just love the stillness and quietness that nature has got to offer.

A few weeks ago, I had been invited to take photographs of a friend’s indoor garden. I thought it would be similar with outdoor garden photography, but I was wrong!

Photographing an indoor garden is trickier. If you find interior photography tricky, consider indoor garden photography a notch higher in terms of difficulty. You get to balance the lighting, colors of vegetation as well as the limited space. And unlike interior photography (usually with an awful light issue), some indoor gardens come with artificial light source. You would find grow lights, just like those found at this site.

Good thing if you are a pro, you can bring in and set up your lighting and do magic with your photos. But not every photographer is equipped with the best lighting instruments that can turn indoor photography into a breeze.

Normally, the greatest challenge in indoor garden photography is lighting. In order to work through this problem, it is important to time the shoot perfectly and to maximize available natural light. The colors of vegetation are more crisp and authentic with natural light. It is best to shoot at daybreak or dusk. At high noon, sunlight can be very bright and controlling it may be a problem.

In some indoor gardens, it can be a challenge dealing with fancy LED grow lights, example a blue or red T5 Grow Light. You know how these fancy LED lights can make the indoor garden look awkward and unnatural. However, some LED lights can add up to composition of your photos. You can effectively use them as added light to give character and value to your shots. Just make sure not to overdo with indoor lighting as it can do more harm than good to your photos.

Before you start clicking your camera, make sure that you are positioned well. This means you have to find a good spots where there is maximum light. Know where the windows and light entry points are. This is critical in every indoor photography project. Check that your exposures are light enough. As much as possible, avoid using your flash. The flash can be tricky when used indoors. And lastly, take as many shots as possible, changing angles and views. Usually, the best images are captured in the most unconventional spots and angles.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Water Damage Woes

Water Damage Woes

Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina

There are few things more damaging to a bustling city than a sudden flood. Even if it isn’t sudden at all but rather takes some time to come on and cause its damage, a flood is still a flood. Overflowing river banks are very different from broken levies and raging ocean waves though. While I didn’t visit during the worst of Hurricane Katrina, I did indeed go to New Orleans and other parts of the southeast United States to take pictures of the massive damage the storm left behind. I really mean it when I say massive too – entire neighborhoods were washed out and destroyed over a period of weeks.

It’s not just the water damage which makes a home unlivable though. Once a house gets wet it normally gets dry again eventually, and everything is fine. But being totally submerged in water and staying that way for days makes it easy for various types of mold to take root in the wooden parts of a home. I don’t think I need to explain just how bad New Orleans looked in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, not with all of the pictures, videos and even documentaries about the event which have already been publicized. But what I can do is help people fight back against water damage in their homes.

That’s not to say I’m going to come help unfortunate families bail water from their basements with buckets. I’m not the young lady I used to be, but besides that, spending a lot of time in a flooded environment can be very bad for your health, especially your respiratory health with all the mold, spores and slimes which tend to grow in flooded-out locations. Instead, I can turn them towards the best machine for getting that water back out of the house and where it belongs. I’m talking about sump pumps of course, like the kind you can see at http://sumppumpjudge.com/.

Such a pump isn’t going to reverse any water damage that has already occurred, but it will remove the water and stop any further damage from piling up. It prepares the space to be cleaned and repaired by doing this, so it’s still an important part of the process. Even if it’s too late to save a basement, stopping the mold from creeping up through the floor and into the walls of your home can save a ton of money on the total cost of repairs. Again, Sump Pump Judge is a great resource for more information about these tools that anyone living near a body of water or in a flood plain should absolutely own.

Stopping water from seeping into the home in the first place is a much better way to prevent damage and limit expenses. However, that means checking for things like insulation, and to see that any cracks in the foundation of the home are filled in and finished off to make them solid again. Many people simply lack the tools and knowledge necessary to do this, but like every other instance where this is true, you can always call on professional help if need be.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Arrows in Time

Arrows in Time

Arrows in TimeWe were in Slovakia. This was a once in a lifetime trip driving across Europe. Starting in Warsaw and Wroclaw in Poland we had then gone to Frankfurt by bus to pick up our car. From there we would drive through 9 countries and at the moment it was Slovakia. As an amateur photographer, this trip was like letting a sweet-toothed monster free in a candy factory. Picture opportunities were everywhere to be seen, and taken, and I did.

In some respects, the capital was a little disappointing although that didn’t stop me from taking at least 120 photos. After some investigation into tourist highlights, we decided on Devin Castle. It was a 90-minute boat ride down the Danube and a 30-minute ride back because of the current. The weather was blistering hot at 39°C and we could only get a ticket for the 2 pm trip. Water! Carry a lot of water.

As you approach Devin Castle, it looks very imposing and apparently built on the bend of the river and on top of a hill for strategic military reasons. Very hard to attack and impossible to go any further without being seen. From the landing point, it was all walking, and uphill. The scenic beauty of the place and the age of the castle ruins made for some glorious photography. The structure’s history goes back to the 9th century and there have been a few wars in the vicinity with the Napoleonic war resulting in the castle being blown up. What a shame. Some restoration has occurred.

A fascinating aspect of the walk was an area set aside under the castle walls where locals dressed in clothing of the 9th century showed how the people lived and hunted and fought. There were longbows, crossbows, swords, daggers, shields and armor. Against my partner’s wishes I spent an inordinately long time here talking to the attendants who were very helpful and knowledgeable and I even took the option of trying the bow and arrows and the crossbow.

I knew a little about crossbows because I had written an article about them from my visit to the Terracotta Warriors in Xi’an, China. I had compared those crossbows, made in 200BC to the crossbow of today using http://arbalistzone.com/ as a reference. This site has all you need to know about what development has occurred in the modern weapon compared to hundreds of years ago.

An astonishing fact about the firing trigger mechanism of the crossbows in Emperor Qin’s time is that the technology has not been able to be repeated in modern days using the same material (bronze) and arriving at the same firing operation. When I was discussing this with the guy that was showing these weapons, he was impressed.

An Excalibur Matrix modern day crossbow has telescopic sights and incredible workmanship and high accuracy. The ancient ones 200 years ago were more a hit and miss contraption but nevertheless well ahead of their time. For fans of Robin Hood and the days of knights and damsels in distress and who thought the crossbow was invented around that time, you’re about 1500 years out!

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Shooting Great Furniture Photography

Shooting Great Furniture Photography

antiqueOne of the recent photography projects I worked on was for an antique furniture shop. It was my first time to work on such a project so I had to do some reading. It may seem simple but the truth is that furniture photography can be quite challenging, even more with antique pieces. The major challenge for the photographer is to present all the key characteristics and features of the antique piece so that the appraiser or buyer will find it a worthy investment.

My client has some of the best antique furniture pieces I’ve seen. They range from the intricately carved wooden cabinets to exquisitely designed wooden mirror frames. I’m amazed at how the early woodworkers were able to create these wonderful pieces. I know there were still no power tools, such as the wood routers found at this site, which would have helped them carve with accuracy and precision.

Shooting furniture requires a lot of time and patience. You need proper lighting to present all the best views or angles of the piece. To achieve optimum lighting, the space should be wide enough (three times the width of the furniture on both sides). It is better if you have control of the lighting, so artificial light with modifiers are highly recommended for furniture photography.

Furniture comes in different varieties of texture: painted, lacquered and upholstered. Some pieces contain a combination of these textures. The texture of the furniture can have a huge impact on the photography techniques you will employ. For instance, upholstered and painted furniture are easier to take photos because of lower reflectivity. Problems with glare and specular highlights are also less of a problem with upholstered and painted furniture. For furniture pieces with these textures, you can use broad light sources. Meanwhile, for lacquered furniture the challenge is to show clearly the wood grain through the lacquer and finish. You have to balance the grain and color beneath and the sheen of the surface. Furthermore, each surface requires different needs for lighting. You have to get different lighting setup.

Shooting Great Furniture Photography

Furniture pieces are considered as architectural pieces and thus you have to be able to feature its lines. This can be achieved by shifting lenses. Use longer lenses to capture better perspective of the piece. You can take focus shots on intricate details to show the patina of the wood. The photos should be able to showcase the aesthetic details of the furniture as well as its overall look.

Overall, I find shooting furniture more like food photography. It’s slow, technical and methodical wherein the subject is just static. That’s where the huge challenge lies. You have to give the furniture pieces its life and story through the photos you shoot.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
How to Clean Brick

How to Clean Brick

How to Clean BrickIn my work, I take many pictures of many people, places and things, for many purposes. But my favorite projects are perhaps the ones where I pick up some meaningful information that I can apply and use later on in my life. One such project had me taking pictures of homes both before and after they were treated with pressure washers, also called power washers by some people. Whatever you call them, they’re these machines that look an awful lot like small generators, with pumps to pull water in from an outside source and then blast it out through a hose and nozzle at an incredible speed.

Well my home happens to be built from bricks, and after I saw how well a pressure washer could blast dirt away from brick, I went out and bought one for myself. This was a while back mind, and I’ve used it a handful of times since then, so I know what I’m talking about when I say they really are excellent machines for cleaning bricks. Not just brick, but also aluminum siding, and even driveways and garage floors. They’re very versatile, but whatever you want to clean has to be pretty sturdy; it would be a mistake to use a pressure washer for windows.

Oh, but where is my mind? As someone who makes a living taking pictures, I really should have included a visual aid for this. You can see plenty of these washers at http://pressurewasherreport.com/, along with information about different makes, models and brands. This website wasn’t around back when I bought my own, but I kind of wish it had been. It’s fairly thorough. Getting back to it though, you would not believe how many little oil spills over the years had left my garage floor looking a mess. Well it’s a common thing, so you might at that.

How to Clean BrickBut even I couldn’t believe how easily this machine seemed to rip the stains right up out of the floor, as if it was tearing the layer of grease off, which I guess is pretty much what it was doing after all. When I was finished, it was like a new slab of cement had been poured and pressed, as if my garage floor was the same one from years ago. I mean, it technically was the same floor the whole time, but it looked like new, and that’s something every cleaner loves to see in what they clean when they are finished.

Seeing how well that went, I naturally opted to turn the pressure washer on the brick walls of my home next. And just like the garage floor, I saw years of dirt, grime and gunk being torn away from the walls by the torrential spray coming from the hose. I tell you, I would not want to be on the receiving end of such a machine. It’s a far cry from getting hit by a garden hose! With that in mind, if you do decide to do some pressure washing at home, be careful not to spray people with the tool.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
How To Make The Perfect Shot Of Your Garden

How To Make The Perfect Shot Of Your Garden

tulips-21620_640If your hobby is gardening, you must enjoy working in it and making it look more beautiful as time goes by. Also, it is hard to imagine a gardener who doesn’t like to take photos of their garden. By photographing changes that occur in your little paradise, you can chart your garden’s progress. Since you put a lot of hard work in order to make your garden pleasant, it is a great idea to capture that work by photographing the growth of your plants. I’ll take this opportunity to give you some tips on how to make the perfect shot of your garden.

Capture different seasons

Each season has its own unique atmosphere, and changes that happen in nature during the course of a single year are amazing. In the spring, capturing the growth of new life is also capturing the effort you’ve put into your garden, since those are all the things you’ve planted and nurtured. So take the photos to witness the changing od the seasons, warm-colored autumn leaves and foggy or snowy landscape during the winter.

Shoot in the best light

It is best to take photos when the sun is low in the sky. The light is redder and softer in the period shortly after sunrise or before sunset. In photography, these times of the day are known as “the golden hours” so choose the right time for your perfect shot wisely. The natural lighting is the best, so make sure you turn off the flash on your camera.

Getting your garden ready

Having a sharp-looking garden makes it easier to take sharp-looking photographs. Clean dead leaves, rinse your plants and pole saw your garden. A good pole saw can do miracles for your trees and shrubs, so before taking a shot, make sure to style them. Pruning is necessary for the health of your plants, for removing damaged parts and keeping up the shape, so consider doing it before taking a shot. Otherwise your trees and shrubs might look untidy. This way the portrait of your garden will be special.

Check out this exceptionally tidy garden on a video by Frank Perkins.

Capturing the essence of your garden

If you take the time to shoot the same thing from different angles, the results may surprise you. If there are too many distracting elements in the photo, lower the viewpoint and zoom in, and the distractions will disappear. Fill the frame with elements that are essential to the picture. If you want to take a picture of the perfect blossom, fill the whole frame with it and don’t include elements around the tree in the picture because it will lose the essence.

Don’t center the object

An image with a perfectly centered subject is static and boring. To avoid that, before you take a picture, make sure to divide your screen into thirds, like a tic-tac-toe grid, and place your object where one of the lines interact. This rule of the thirds will direct the viewer’s eye on the object because of the unequal negative space around it. This is a much more balanced and natural composition.

Use the sky as background

Photographing small objects near the ground can turn out looking cluttered and dark, which makes it difficult for your object to stand out. You can avoid this problem by shooting from a very low angle so that the sky becomes the background.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
6 Things That Every Photographer Should Have in The Field

6 Things That Every Photographer Should Have in The Field

camera-918565_1280If you take photos in the studio, probably you can easily use all you need because you have it at hand. If you’re going to take a picture on the field, then you will not take all the equipment from the studio. You will carry only the most necessary things. Besides the camera, these accessories are essential:

Bag for the camera. If you don’t have a camera bag, be sure to get one if you sometimes want to have free hands. Otherwise, your camera will be in your hands non-stop, or you will leave it anywhere and spend time making sure that someone does not break it or steal. In the bag, your camera is always at hand and safe. The bag is not only for the camera. You can put  there other accessories that you must have with you.

Memory card. Your camera certainly has some memory, but if you want good photos, then you need to shoot a lot of photos. Sometimes, this can burden the memory capacity of your camera and slow down its work. So, you need to have a memory card on which you store the recording. The advantage of the memory card is also that images are saved, even if your camera breaks down.

Extra batteries. Which batteries you will use, depends on your device. The most important thing is to always have spare batteries. It is needless to say that the battery should be full and correct. One way to check the voltage of your battery is to put them in a practical multimeter. It will read the voltage of your battery and display the value on the screen. Defective, empty batteries are only an additional burden.

Equipment for cleaning. If you are a serious photographer, you know that cleaning equipment must find its place in your bag. When you’re on the ground, dust can easily dirty your lens. Microfiber cloths and brushes for cleaning does not take up much space, and can save your photo session.

Filters. Well, since you carry a bag, it is useful to put filters in it. There are various kinds of filters: UV filters, ND filters, polarizing filters, and so on. The advantage of this accessory, among other things, is that it protects your lens from dirt and damage. It is easier and cheaper to remove, clean and replace the filter than the lens on your camera.

Tripod and monopod. Well, this might not fit in your bag, but it is definitely an accessory that is worth taking when you take pictures in the field. It is another way to free up your hands and make good pictures that require a steady hand. They help make better shooting in darker environments and enable capturing self-portraits.

These are only the most basic things that you need to take with you to create a successful photo session. Maybe they fit in a bag, but they are not irrelevant. Imagine that your battery has discharged in the middle of the shooting, and that you have no others at hand. Where will you get it when you’re out in nature? Some things you just cannot improvise. And finally, it should not be the object of your interest. Do not allow coincidences to hinder you. Take these little things with you and focus on the good shots.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
How to Take Boxing Pictures

How to Take Boxing Pictures

boxing-984174_1280Looking for the right sports activity for my child, my son and I visited a lot of martial arts clubs and attended to various competitions. Of course, we did not bypass boxing match. I was curious, whether this sport is good for my child, but I also took the opportunity to try to make great pictures. Taking pictures of a boxing match can be a big challenge, but I have a few tips that I can share.

Familiarize yourself with the sport. Boxing has its own rules and movements that make it special. To make good photographs in the ring, it is good to be informed about the sport. You can do this by going to a boxing training or in a boxing match. In this way, you are introduced to the movements and the circumstances in which you take a picture. Boxing movements are specific. Besides fighting with a partner, they are practicing on punching bags like these. When you meet them, you will know when to shoot your picture.

Find a good position. Where you stand during the match depends on whether you want to capture the entire boxer’s body or just its upper body. For photos of the upper body, you will need to get closer. If you are a professional, you have the experience and permission, you can take pictures in the ring. Then you need to know how to move around the ring without disturbing the match. If you think that capturing in the ring is not for you, you can take pictures out of the ring. Then you take photos below and between the ropes. However, keep in mind that the light over the ring may ruin the picture taken from below. If you take photos of the whole fighter, then consider a higher position that will allow you to see the entire ring and take pictures over the rope.

Follow the match. If you really want to capture a good time and show the fervor in the fight, then it is necessary to follow the match. All matches do not start with the same intensity. It largely depends on the fighters, their level of readiness and motivation. It is up to you to capture the moment when the match is at its peak, and when the fight brings the most fervor. In fact, it is necessary to predict the crucial moment. To do this, you need to follow the matches with full attention.

Pay attention to the light. Lights on the ring and around it can give bad reflection. Look where the lights are and how to position yourself in relation to them. Sometimes, the light changes during the match. It is therefore, very important to check exposure on your camera.

Select the appropriate shutter speed. Boxing involves plenty of kicks, and those are quick movements. Without the proper shutter speed, it is impossible to make good fast-moving images. They will always be blurred. Bring equipment that allows a fast shutter speed and be prepared for a lot of bad shots. Take a big enough memory card.

Even if you are not a boxing fan, the sport can be a great inspiration for good photos. It is true almost every time when you step out of your comfort zone. Next time when you run short of inspiration, search for it in the ring.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Living life to the fullest

Living life to the fullest

What is the one thing everyone wants just to be happy? A good book, some really good food and some good music! These are the most beautiful of all combinations. With these if one can blend in the mild breeze of the beaches or the sunset down the hills or the snow clad peaks, that view would only enhance the entire experience if it can do anything more.

People who want to live their lives boundless without the shackles of any bondage and with joy and fun and enjoy the moments of life, then he or she cannot just sit at his or her cozy comfortable houses and spend the life in the recluse of the job and family, but he or she will venture out in the open and try to explore the whole wide world on their own and be like a free bird and live their lives to the fullest.

For the basic ingredients of a good life, a good book is always a good companion. It is one those few great friends who literally has no stop to all those wonderful tales to tell. A good book will absorb you in yourself and will make you fall in love with you all over again. You will find the solace of world at its pages and find yourself younger again. Apart from the knowledge that it provides us, a good book is like a classic Mozart played in a solo violin, whose chords strikes deep into your heart and you can feel every beat, every rhythm.

A good piece of music soothes all souls. It is like the love of a mother. It is universal and reaches out to all. Though the kind and the type of music differs in different parts of the world as the taste for music depends on their culture and their habitation, but the universal appeal of music is true in whichever part of the whole wide world you visit. Some like a guitar, some like trumpets and some like violins. And learning a new instrument is no big-a-deal now.

With the help of the internet everyone and anyone can learn about anything nowadays. There are sites which will walk you down from selecting your instrument and even help you learn to play it. Apps are there as well which are available at almost free or at very reasonable cost. Like, if you want to get to know about some good electrical violins you can get all information just by clicking going through this link. It is all at the tip of your finger. You just need to have the will to get it and play it.

To add to the fulfillment of life as a whole, one just needs to have some good food to him or her. Good food makes you smile even in your most upset moments. Food is the best way to win any heart. There are so many countries in this world and every country have a separate specialty dish and they all are just fabulous to make your life complete.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Tips on photographing moving objects

Tips on photographing moving objects

Tips on photographing moving objectsWhile normal still photography is something that can be mastered by everyone, when it comes to moving objects,  a majority end up with blurred images. But it is actually easy to photograph a driving car, moving water, animal, person etc. as the settings and technique are the same as the regular photographs. One main difference is the speed of the shutter, which should be adjusted.

You can know the shutter setting by using the shutter priority mode and viewing via the rear viewfinder. When you press the shutter switch halfway, you will find the setting number in the screen inside.  Since every situation involving a moving object is unique there is no specific shutter speed setting. But you can follow certain guidelines on the speeds, you need to begin with and alter it higher or lower based on the result you get. Here are some different situations I have had personal experience in, which would help you get a clear idea about the setting.

Moving water

For moving water when I want to slow the movement, I begin with a speed of 1/8th sec. After a few trial shots, and if the results are not as expected, I slow the speed further down to ¼ and even ½ until I get the result I want. It is always experimentation as the lighting differs based on the location. No two moving water scenes can come with the same lighting.

Therefore, you need to start with 1/8th and move down from there onwards until you get it right. My nephew had bought a new quadcopter at http://quadcopterguru.com/ and wanted to take a shot of it in motion and was quite pleased with the result. When you are adept at adjusting the shutter speed, it is easier. If you need to freeze a water drop using a faster speed of about 1/160th second or more is needed.

Moving people

For people, you need to start at 1/125th second in case they are walking and you want to focus on the person. If you want to blur the individual then a slower speed of 1/30th second is needed.

For people running in a race or a similar setting, a starting speed of 1/250th second is necessary. If you want to blur the person, turn the speed down to 1/60th second. I had taken a picture of my nephew running along with his BLADE NANO QX BNF, which came out quite beautifully.

Moving car

For shooting racing cars, a speed of 1/1300 sec is needed. In case you are blurring the car, a speed of 1/125th sec is appropriate, if the car is moving at 30 mph.  For a faster moving car, the speed should be doubled to about 1/150th second. This will produce a blur or moderate movement.

Panning

The photographs showing cars in action use a technique named as panning. This shows intentional movement. The background is blurred, while the car is in clear focus. You should start with 1/60th second shutter speed and not 1/4th second, which many try to do. This can be used for capturing racehorses, jockeys and other fast moving objects.

Quick look into panning:

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
The evolution of camera

The evolution of camera

The pursuit for happiness is the labor everyone undertakes. It is like running after a phoenix that will eventually burn him into the grounds but will again rise from its ashes itself and will again fly high up into the sky. But when it burns it will take in all our heart with it and when it flies it will take our spirits to the seventh sky.

These moments of high excitement is what makes memories. Memories are the most precious things all men possess which are his or her companion or sometimes the only friend especially in our solitude. These moments are the things that make our lives sweet as we can look back at them and smile or shed a tear or two and laugh and sigh and call it a day, at the end.

Man has always been in the pursuit of capturing these Kodak moments and while doing so he had come across a lot of life altering discoveries and inventions. The discovery of optics and its consequent developments have made man capable to proceed further on his way to quench his eager thirst to attain some solid means by which he could capture memories.

Since its invention, the science and the technology of camera has undergone changes of versatility and month proportions. But if we look back at the pages of history, it will be not at all of any trouble to find out the inventions that altered our imagination and made us to think about the marvel of the human genius as we gasped and sighed and concluded that nothing can be more advanced than this.

Camera Obscura as called the first pin whole camera was invented by Alhazen in the 1500s. Then came along the Daguerreotype Camera introduce in the year 1839. Brought forward by the French Academy of Sciences, they were the world’s most expensive cameras.

Then came along more inventions down the line and with each the camera technology underwent more and more upgradations. Along the years, the world saw the first patented American camera patented in the name of Alexander Walcott. There were a few more names as well like Thomas Sutton and Oliver Wendell Holmes. Then in the year 1888, the Kodak roll film came to change our lives. George Eastman was the pioneer in usage of photographic films in camera, though they were very cheap and simple in to use.  The Raise Camera also was quite famous for its weight and dimensions.

Technology further progressed and came along the Oskar by the Germans. The most important thing about a good picture is light and one who knows how to capture a good photograph must know its technologies. Today, one can find a good range of lights that will give you a whole new dimension in photography like these which you will find here. The Polaroid camera of the 1948 was one such camera which not only used light best, but also gave a printed picture in just a minute.

Though the cameras have changed down the ages from pin holed to DSLRs, yet their main utility remains the same, to capture the moments of our lives we would be able to cherish in our free time.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Construction Photography

Construction Photography

Industries experience ups and downs, but there is a handful which never fails to persist even when others around them are killed off one by one. There are the big three of course – food service and restaurants, cosmetologists and beauticians, and bars, clubs and other venues serving alcohol. Even when people are poor and impoverished, they still like to eat, look good and feel good, and these are in my opinion the main reasons these industries have always flourished. Construction is another industry which experiences occasional stagnation but seems to always bounce back sooner or later.

I know this because I get a good deal of business from those in construction. People in the homebuilding business really like to show off the fact they can build quality homes, naturally. That’s why they call me in to get pictures of the foundation, then the construction, and finally the finished product. I’ve had many jobs like that in my lifetime. But that’s just the residential side of it. Firms building massive warehouses, production centers and metal shops also need photographers to come in and help tell the outside world their personal story. I’m thrilled at being able to help so many like this, with my camera.

Speaking of shops, it’s rather interesting to see some of the tools that go into building something. Construction used to be about mortar, wood, hammers and nails, and to some extent it still is. But these days there are far more tools which go into the construction of any given building. You can check here for a good example of one such tool – the reciprocating saw. These are used initially to cut down larger pieces of material into smaller pieces which are easier to work with. It’s also good for jobs that don’t really need to look good, but do need to be done well and quickly.

I also get the occasional contract from the aftermarket. What I mean is, a construction firm might really like potential customers to see how well they can build a home. After that though, the home needs to be sold, and I sometimes help in that regard, taking photographs for realtors and real estate agents to help them sell their docket of homes. This isn’t really the sort of thing I travel to foreign countries to do though. With this type of work, I just keep it local, since it doesn’t tend to pay as much as some of the more exotic projects I’ve had a part in.

Getting back to the tools though, I’ve actually picked up a few different ones for use in and around my home, based on the operations I saw them performing when I was taking pictures for those construction companies. I’m quite fond of those reciprocating saws for chopping up old, dead plants in my garden and cutting away weeds and other nuisance plants. They’re versatile tools which are good for a lot more than just cutting wood, you know. You can read more about them at Jason Saw Reviews if you like.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
My Take on Home Interior Photography

My Take on Home Interior Photography

Many people think that photography is easy… not until they try it. If you own a home design website or blog, you probably know how difficult it is to compose that perfect home interior shot. I have done a number of home photography projects for several clients, and I have to admit, every project presents unique challenges.

You have to be imaginative to make the home look gorgeous and attractive. I’ve done a special photography project for a friend who works in a real estate firm. He wanted to make a portfolio of a freshly renovated one-story, two-bedroom house.

The challenge was for me to make it appear spacious, cozy and casual, but the biggest challenge is the tight schedule. I had to shoot right away (immediately after the interior decorating team gives a green light.) We only have a couple of days to complete this project.

Anybody will know that it is freshly renovated because of the nauseating scent of the new paint. I’ve also seen the power tools that the workers might have left behind. I could see the oscillating tool, much like the ones reviewed on this site. Immediately I got a ring from the interior design team, I headed straight to the home to take photos. It was tough since the home was very small and tight. Never mind the overpowering smell of paint.

My Take on Home Interior PhotographyAnyway, I guess, I managed to compose good shots. The final output made the home interior look gorgeous. I highlighted some great details of the living room, such as the attention-grabbing fireplace. The colors of the floor tiles and the place rugs blended well with the furniture. Additional accents such as the picture frames, magazines, table runners, floral arrangements, etc. made the space look crisp. I had to remove a few items because it made the interior look cluttered.

One important tip in home interior photography is to keep styling and staging very simple. The photo must tell a story about the place – how one would feel if they were there. And obviously, no one wants a cluttered space.

I was lucky to have a great weather during the shoot. The lighting was just superb. The curtains and blinds resulted in subdued lighting effect that made the photographs look fuller. I did not use too much additional lighting, as I wanted to make the photo feel natural. At some dark spots, I needed to use extra light just to control contrast.

It took me a lot of shot before I could make a good shot. If you are taking home photographs, be sure to bring an extra camera and memory. You want to keep shooting.

This project could easily be one of the toughest I’ve done so far but since it was a friend’s request, I considered it extra special. And I’m glad that my friend loved the final output very much. I managed to make the home interior look gorgeous and highlight the innate charm of the home.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Industrial Photography

Industrial Photography

Even after doing this for years, it still surprises me sometimes when certain clients come to me looking for photography work. Specifically, those people seeking industrial photography seem to stand out the most. They really only fall into two distinct brands of people too.

Either they have tools or a work space they want photographed, or as is more often the case, I end up looking at big, empty warehouses that someone is considering converting into lofts. I tend to think of both types of pictures as industrial photography since they pretty much involve the same kinds of areas and settings.

I’ve done plenty of work in both instances, so I feel confident talking about it now. Because the majority is clearly from the empty warehouse being converted to lofts side, I’ll talk about that first. This isn’t exactly a new practice. Investors have been converting old, empty industrial buildings like warehouses and factories into living space for years.

I’ve photographed many such warehouses too, and I always get the same, lonely feeling when I’m doing it. That happens with most of the large, empty spaces I take pictures of, but there’s something almost tragic about a workplace where no more work is done.

I rather enjoy getting pictures of places with people in them; they add some life and presence to images which are otherwise just empty buildings with lots of dark corners. Shops full of people working machines producing goods, now those are a delight to capture with my camera, even if they can be rather noisy.

Getting pictures of devices such as these finishing up products and getting them ready for shipping, well, it may not account for a significant portion of my work, but it is still work which I enjoy. All that energy in one place is just fun to be around.

Getting pictures of big, active factories and warehouses is almost always so those same businesses can try to attract new clients and contracts. The companies want prospective clients to see this image they’re trying to project, to be impressed by it and ultimately to send their business because of it.

Because of this, I don’t just focus on wide open factory floors or people working on assembly lines. Getting pictures of finished products as well as the finishing process itself is something I usually do. To not do this would be like taking before and after pictures without the after pictures.

As is often the case with my projects, I end up learning something about the subject of my photography, even when I’m taking pictures of things like belt sanders and pneumatic drills. For instance, did you know that not all belt sanders actually feature the rolling rubber belts for which the machines were initially named?

Some of these devices can be held rather easily in a single hand today, with no need for the heavy tables that take up so much floor space in a shop environment. Power tools are kind of like cameras in this sense since both are constantly getting smaller while doing more.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Elements That Make Up A Good Photograph

Elements That Make Up A Good Photograph

It is essential for one to have a hobby in their life and there is a wide variety of options for individuals who may be looking for things to do during their free time. The choices present one with a myriad of different alternatives and it is up to an individual to choose what particularly suits them according to their interests and likes.

Photography is one such option that is presented to the public and there are a lot of people who have taken this activity up as a fun thing to do during their free time. Such individuals may have taken up the activity as a means of simply having fun and passing the time while others may actually have a more serious approach towards it and dream of one day finally making a career out of it. No matter the reason, learning how to take a good photograph is something that would go a long way in enhancing the overall experience of the activity.

When one learns how to take a good picture, they are able to enjoy the results of their efforts more wholly than they would have should the end result represent a shoddy collection of amateurish images that cannot even be easily distinguished in most cases. It is in human’s nature to want to be good at whatever an individual sets out in doing, especially when the decision of taking up such an activity was not forced on them and they are willing participants of the activity.

Taking a good picture is not as easy as it sounds however and one cannot compare to other simple acts such as hanging the finished product on the wall. One will need more than just a framing nailer from FRAMINGNAILERPRO to ensure the photo sticks in a viewer’s mind and as such it is essential for one to work on the skill.

Contrary to what many people who are not involved in the activity as a profession would assume, taking a photograph does not simply consist of pointing a camera at the desired object that one would wish to capture and pressing a button. There are a lot of considerations that need to be taken into account before one is finally able to take a picture that can be considered worthy of greatness so to speak. Photography is an art form that requires mastering and one would actually need a couple of years’ experience if not professional education in order to learn how to take what can be described as the perfect photo.

However there are a number of elements that can be taken into consideration when one practices that can immensely improve the quality of the picture that is taken without the need for experience or educational background. Some of these elements include:

  1. Angles – this is something that is not considered by a lot of people but the angle at which a photo is taken can greatly improve the clarity of a subject.
  2. Lighting – This is a more obvious element but it should be noted that too much light behind the subject may hinder the clarity of the photo. One should not stand behind a bright light whilst having their photo taken for instance.

It\'s only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn